The Villa

CMOIRENC 184294

“This place was created for the pleasure of sharing what I love with as many people as possible. I prefer the word “share” to word “transmit”. That is why I like accessible works. Art needs to speak.”

Edouard Carmignac

At first, there was a farm, seen in “Pierrot le fou”, the Jean-Luc Godard movie. In the 1980s, Henri Vidal, an architect and inventor of reinforced earth, transformed the farm into a villa. Invited to the wedding of one of his daughters, Édouard Carmignac fell in love with the estate. He subsequently imagined turning it into a place dedicated to the arts. This project has unfolded over the last few years, thanks to the involvement of Atelier Barani for the design, and the GMAA agency for the project’s adaptation and extension.

The Villa Carmignac is set at the heart of a National Park and on a listed site. Additional construction is not authorized on the land. The entire project has thus consisted of clearing 2,000 square meters of space beneath the surface, without modifying the house’s contours or the existing landscape.

Inside the villa, the spaces expand and extend in the shape of a cross. In the center, an
aquatic ceiling lets in natural light and illuminates these underwater spaces. The visitor walks freely around voluminous spaces marked by visual openings onto the vineyards.

In technical terms, the building meets all of the museum standards, in a sober design that fits into the landscape, enabling the Villa Carmignac to welcome the best works under optimal conditions.

The Villa

Photo C. Moirenc
Photo C. Moirenc
Photo C. Moirenc
Photo C. Moirenc
photo : Laurent Lecat
Photo Laurent Lecat

The Villa and its gardens are open to the public

Tuesday to Sunday (closed on Mondays) from 10 am to 6 pm
Last entry at 4.30 pm

Nocturnals on Thursdays until 9pm (on July and August)
Last admission at 7.30pm




Map push tickets

Are you nearby ? Come and visit us in Porquerolles !

The Villa's permanent works

Miquel Barceló

Born in Felanitx, Spain, 1957

Photo Camille Moirenc
Photo Camille Moirenc

Alycastre, 2018

Welcoming visitors at the entrance of Villa Carmignac, this imposing sculpture by the Spanish artist Miquel Barceló is inspired by the mythical figure of the Alycastre, the legendary dragon of Porquerolles. The myth narrates that Ulysses, on the road to Ithaca, ran ashore on a beach of the island and had to fight the animal, which had been sent by Poseidon. Conquered by the hero, the noble creature asked that this place bear his name. Half skull and half sea monster, this sculpture by Miquel Barceló appears to guard the Villa. It recalls both the mythological universe of the Odyssey and the world of piracy that raged for a long time on the island, the many caves of the island would have been used to hide the loot. These are also popular themes of exploration for the Spanish artist who is passionate about cave art and the seabed, a recurring motif in his work.

Miquel Barceló

Born in Felanitx, Spain, 1957

Photo Luc Boegly
Photo Luc Boegly

Not yet titled, 2018

The idea for this extraordinary painting, specially commissioned for the Porquerolles site, came to the Spanish artist Miquel Barceló after a swim on the island. The octopus he saw when diving finds itself in this monumental aquatic landscape, amongst representations of other specimens, also oversized. All are bathed in natural light and seem to evolve serenely in the enveloping canvas. The work joins another painting by Barceló in the collection, also on the theme of the seabed, a passion particularly conducive to experimentation for this artist.

Bruce Nauman

Né en 1941 à Fort Wayne, États-Unis

Photo M. Domage
Photo M. Domage

One hundred fish fountain, 2005

This permanent work exists within the context of the animal sculptures that Bruce Nauman has been making since Carousel (1988). The hybrid and tragic creatures of early years have given way to realism and life. The seven types of fish perfectly represented here are those that the artist used to fish as a child: catfish, salmon, seabass, whitefish….
Repetition, noise, silence and the impenetrability of the installation gives this work a particular sense of life. One Hundred Fish Fountain, a work that resonates in this insular setting, instilling the human condition with both gaiety and gravity.

Janaina Mello Landini

Born in São Gotardo, Brasil, 1974

Photo Janaina Mello Landini
Photo Janaina Mello Landini

Ciclotrama 50 (wind), 2018

The Brazilian artist Janaina Mello Landini weaves and decorates space the way someone twists and unravels a piece of rope. Known for her large site-specific installations, which she has been developing for the past eight years and naming Ciclotramas, she seeks to create works that capture experience and redefine spaces through a network of paths, movements and flows made up of interconnected and interdependent entities. The entanglement of ropes and nylon threads, which Janaina Mello Landini unravels, weaves and rearranges, creates a physical tension across imaginary networks. The choreography created by the coiling and intertwining of strands that at times float in space and at other times are attached to props produces an organic whole. Reminiscent of such natural elements as plant roots, nerve endings or microscopic structures, the Ciclotramas strive to recreate a kind of social mapping of individual networks that evoke the infinite interconnections and interdependencies of our existence across different living systems.

Tony Matelli

Born in Chicago, United States, 1971

Photo : L. Boegly
Photo : L. Boegly

Weed (#389), 2017

With his humorous reinterpretations of American hyperrealism, Tony Matelli is known for his surprising and sometimes disturbing sculptures that disrupt the space. The artist makes Weed (#389) out of sunlight and water – ubiquitous elements throughout the exhibition. As it grows inside the Villa each year, the young plant, like a weed, pierces the ground in order to further resist the site’s architecture.
An act of ecological activism somewhere between reality and the imagination, the work is a representation of the relationship between the gardens and the Villa, and acts as a witness to the site’s porosity.